Parents, family members, and other caring adults

One minute you’re noting the details of a dental appointment, then pivot to reminding yourself to pick up more beets, then “bam” your kid walks into the kitchen and comes out as non-binary. And now the dog wants back in. Seriously, this is how it happens, people.

It’s important to acknowledge that parents and family members also go through their own process after a child comes out. This is completely normal – it’s a natural response to taking in new information about someone’s self-hood. 

Whether you had an inkling, or it was a complete surprise, this is the place for you. Learn how to advocate, educate, and support your child while navigating all the things.

1:1 Support

This is designed to provide a private and safe space for you to explore questions, concerns, or anything else related to your child’s coming out process. This model provides a place to express your own personal experience during this transition, and have very candid conversations about understanding this aspect of your child’s identity. We’ll meet for an hour and cover whichever areas you’d like during this time. This is all about getting you where you need to be, as person and a parent.

 

I’ll help you…

  • Develop a greater awareness of the experiences unique to our LGBTQ kiddos

  • Unpack any unconscious baggage that is preventing a deeper connection with your child

  • Talk through potential scenarios with less than supportive family members, and create strategies that will best support your child

 

Group workshops (6-8 people)

Welcome to the power of the small group!

We’ll meet for 90 minutes and discuss family dynamics related to a child’s coming out, talking to kids about sexual orientation or gender, and have in-depth conversations about the complexities of growing up as LGBTQ.

 

I’ll help you…

  • Talk about supporting LGBTQ kiddos who might not be yours

  • Learn safe, healthy ways to advocate and intervene on behalf of a child in an unsupportive environment

  • Prepare for questions and age-appropriate responses for questions about same-sex attractions, gender expression, or news in the media (“bathroom bills”, marriage equality, etc.)

They, She, Ze, He … Revisiting Why Pronouns Matter

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Email me:  Info@DoubleTallLLC.com
United States